How The Sun Sees You

Sun is dangerous.

Solar radiation builds up in the system and the impact caused reveals itself years later (as premature skin aging, increased risk of skin cancer, eye damage, etc.).


A picture is worth a thousand words. Watch this striking video that demonstrates how a sunscreen cream is blocking UV light.


In 2014, the photographer Thomas Leveritt took a UV camera in one hand and a sunscreen cream in the other, and went out into the streets of Brooklyn to show people how their skin looked like in ultraviolet. The project was called “How the sun sees us”.

Ultraviolet reveals skin microdamages, wrinkles, pigmentation, and freckles. These are the damaging effects of skin exposure to UV (children have yet to suffer the damages). Once sunscreen is applied, the skin turns black as seen with a UV camera, i.e. it becomes UV-proof.

What are the key takeaways from the video?

  • It’s important to apply the cream evenly without missing any spots on the skin (didn’t it ever happen to you to get sunburn all over your body except that spot on which you accidentally dropped some cream earlier?)
  • Apply enough cream. Two layers are better than one. A thick layer is better than a thin one.
  • Remember to cream wrists and feet, neck (especially the back of it), ears and the back of the knees.
  • Apply a sunscreen cream over exposed body parts.
  • Avoid applying the cream around the eyes. Wear sunglasses to protect the skin around your eyes.
  • Apply cream 15-30 minutes before going out into the sun. Sunscreen cream takes time to sink into your skin.
  • Upon returning home, wash the sunscreen cream off as well as dust, sweat, and smog.
  • Reapply cream regularly (every 1.5-2 hours), especially if your child is swimming, sweating or rubs himself with a towel.
  • Always follow the instructions.